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  • 21 Essential English Idioms To Sound Like a Native Speaker

    Learning English idioms is an essential part of taking your English to the next level. If you already know about 200 words in English, your next step is to expand your English vocabulary with things like idioms and slang while practicing conversational English with a native English teacher.This approach will allow you to quickly get from an intermediate level of English fluency to an advanced level.

    So why is learning English idioms an important aspect of learning English? Firstly, learning idioms will improve your English comprehension making it easy for you to understand what native English speakers are saying. For example, a native English speaker might say “Get off your high horse, you are making everyone else uncomfortable”. If you have an knowledge of idioms, you will learn that this expressions has nothing to do with an actual horse but is a way of asking someone not to be arrogant or superior.

    Further, idioms are a lovely gateway to learning more about culture. A lot of American idioms come from popular American sports such as baseball and football. Examples are idioms like “playing quarterback” or “hitting it out of the park” or “a home-run”. Also, there are a lot of idioms are have originated from food. Some examples are “easy as pie” or “to go banana’s” .

    So let’s get started in today’s essential idiom list. These are 21 of the most commonly used idioms that every intermediate student should learn:

     

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    Get Going

    The boy’s teasing always get’s grandma going

    gets grandma angry

     

    Sight for sore eyes

    After a long day of walking, the fresh tea was a sight for our sore eyes

    a pleasant sight; a welcome sight

     

    Flat-footed

    The quiz caught Jane flat-footed as she had not studied anything

    not prepared

     

    Sidekick

    When ever you saw Phil, you would also see his faithful sidekick Tim walking with him

    Close friend of lesser status

     

    Get Even

    Phil was furious about what Carl did and he said he will get even after Christmas

    to take revenge; do something to hurt someone

     

    Flip Out

    It is impossible to talk to Henry today. He must have flipped out.

    To go crazy; to go out of one’s mind

     

    Shrug off

    The comedian shrugged off the booing fans and continued with the show.

    Act as if you are not interested; act as if you did not care

     

    Get Around To

    I plan to get around to cleaning my desk this weekend

    to find time to do something that has been getting postponed for a while

     

    Sick and Tired

    Wei was sick and tired of studying grammar everyday but not been able to speak fluently in English

    Dislike; getting frustrated

     

    Flesh Out

    The singer fleshed out his idea to the producer by playing some notes on the piano

    Add more detail; to expand; to make bigger

     

    Over With

    After studying for 6 months, Prateek was happy to get over with the IELTS

    Finish; To end

     

    Shy Away

    The organizers shied away from the reporter’s questions

    Avoid; seemed frightened

     

    Out of Whack

    Ben felt the whole band was out of whack because the bass player was not playing well

    Not working right

     

    Leave a bad taste in one’s mouth

    Her rudeness to the babysitter left a bad taste in my mouth

    a bad impression; make you feel disgusted

     

    Hot Air

    That was just a lot of hot air what Alan said

    Nonsense; exaggerated talk

     

    Can of worms

    The police knew that opening the case would open up a huge can of worms

    many new problems

     

    Get off one’s high horse

    I wish John would get off his high horse for once and worked better with the team

    Be humble; be less arrogant

     

    Hot Number

    My mom’s new lemonade recipe was a hot number at the fair

    Popular; got a lot of attention

     

    Spoken English Trial Lesson

     

    December 21, 2015
    21 December 2015,
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